Category: Sports Injuries Massage

Massage for Muscle Pulls & Strains

Massage for Muscle Pulls & Strains

A muscle strain, or pulled muscle, occurs when your muscle is overstretched or torn. This usually occurs as a result of fatigue, overuse, or improper use of a muscle. Strains can happen in any muscle, but they’re most common in your lower back, neck, shoulder, and hamstring, which is the muscle behind your thigh.

These strains can cause pain and may limit movement within the affected muscle group. Mild to moderate strains can be successfully treated at home with ice, heat, and anti-inflammatory medications. Severe strains or tears may require medical treatment.

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Muscle injuries

Muscle injuries

Muscle injuries is a broad term encompassing many pathologies and these are common injuries in both elite and amateur athletes as well as in the general population.

Skeletal muscle injuries represent a great part of all traumas in sports medicine, with an incidence from 10% to 55% of all sustained injuries. The muscles and muscle groups more frequently involved are the hamstrings, rectus femoris, and the medial head of the gastrocnemius. They should be treated with the necessary precaution since a failed treatment can postpone an athlete’s return to the field for weeks or even months and increase the risk of re-injury.

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Leg Pain Facts

Leg Pain Facts

Characterized by aches, numbness, tingling, burning, or weakness, leg pain quite often is not caused by a problem in the leg or foot, but rather by a condition in the lower back. In fact, with many low back problems, there is actually little or no low back pain.

Compression or pressure on any of the nerve roots in the low back can cause pain, numbness, or weakness along the different nerves as they travel down through the leg and into the foot. Because the sciatic nerve is commonly affected, leg pain and related symptoms are often generally referred to as sciatica, although medical professionals prefer the term radiculopathy.

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Facts and Massage for Knee Injuries

Facts and Massage for Knee Injuries

The knee is a complicated joint. It moves like a door hinge, allowing a person to bend and straighten their legs so they can sit, squat, jump, and run.

Knee pain is a common complaint that affects people of all ages. Knee pain may be the result of an injury, such as a ruptured ligament or torn cartilage. Medical conditions — including arthritis, gout, and infections — also can cause knee pain.

Many types of minor knee pain respond well to self-care measures. Physical therapy and knee braces also can help relieve knee pain. In some cases, however, your knee may require surgical repair.

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Iliopsoas Pain

Iliopsoas Pain

Iliopsoas tendonitis is characterized by pain and clicking or snapping in the groin or front of the hip. Because the iliopsoas muscle acts as a hip flexor, symptoms are often worse when bending the hip, especially against resistance. The iliopsoas tendon is fairly close to the skin.

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Facts for Athletes on Sports Injury Icing

Facts for Athletes on Sports Injury Icing

Many are familiar with Dr. Gabe Mirkin’s simple advice for treating acute sports injuries, RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation). In fact, most individuals have been told to “put ice on it” in some capacity or another for as long as they can remember. Now, almost forty years after its original publication, Dr. Mirkin has caught the sports medicine world by storm with his 2014 retraction. “Almost forty years ago, I coined the term RICE as the treatment for acute sports injuries. Subsequent research shows that rest and ice can actually delay recovery. Mild movements help tissue to heal and the application of cold suppresses the immune responses that start and hasten recovery.”1

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