Category: Deep Tissue Massage

Insertional Achilles Tendinitis

Insertional Achilles Tendinitis

Insertional Achilles tendinitis involves the lower portion of the heel, where the tendon attaches (inserts) to the heel bone. In both non insertional and insertional Achilles tendinitis, damaged tendon fibers may also calcify (harden). Bone spurs (extra bone growth) often form with insertional Achilles tendinitis. Insertional Achilles Tendinitis is pain and inflammation at the insertion of the Achilles Tendon on the heel bone. It is often associated with swelling, redness, and calcium buildup (small bump) located at the back of the heel (see picture). Pressure at the back of the heel tends to be sensitive and painful. In the clinic, some of my clients often report that certain tight shoes might cause more pain in this area from the pressure and have to sometimes resort to open back shoes.  

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Peroneal Tendonitis / Superior Peroneal Retinaculum (spr) & Cross-Fiber Friction Massage

Peroneal Tendonitis / Superior Peroneal Retinaculum (spr) & Cross-Fiber Friction Massage

I don’t like long complicated answers so here’s goes! I guess I got a little carried away! LOL

Your question is about friction massage and a tendon called the superior peroneal retinaculum (spr). I work on a lot of runners with many similar issues. You don’t say how long ago and how you injured your ankle. You also don’t mention if you have had an MD or specialist look at you and did they refer you to have x-rays or an MRI. If you have insurance the MRI would be very helpful. You also don’t mention if you have had Physical Therapy for your leg and foot. I’ve found in the past that MRI with or without a diagnosis combined with a good physical therapist and a knowledgeable sports LMT works pretty well.  Regardless, applying different friction massages in different areas of the foot and leg is what works. I’ve found that you should also work the entire foot, calf muscles, and the front of the leg at many different angles. Unfourtually, most people can’t apply the pressure needed and take the pain that is required to break up the microscopic adhesions and scar tissue to increase blood and oxygen flow in those areas that already have limited blood and oxygen flow.

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Massage for Muscle Pulls & Strains

Massage for Muscle Pulls & Strains

A muscle strain, or pulled muscle, occurs when your muscle is overstretched or torn. This usually occurs as a result of fatigue, overuse, or improper use of a muscle. Strains can happen in any muscle, but they’re most common in your lower back, neck, shoulder, and hamstring, which is the muscle behind your thigh.

These strains can cause pain and may limit movement within the affected muscle group. Mild to moderate strains can be successfully treated at home with ice, heat, and anti-inflammatory medications. Severe strains or tears may require medical treatment.

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Massage & Facts on Muscle Knots

Massage & Facts on Muscle Knots

A muscle knot is a painful or tender spot in a muscle. It feels tight and sore, and it often happens in the upper back or legs. They’re not usually harmful, but they can certainly be uncomfortable. In rare cases, muscle knots are a sign of a long-term (or chronic) pain condition. 

Chances are, you’ve experienced the tender, achy feeling of a muscle knot at some point in your life. Research has shown that muscle knots may affect up to 85 percent of the population. Muscle knots impair mobility, cause pain, and can reduce a person’s quality of life.

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Muscle injuries

Muscle injuries

Muscle injuries is a broad term encompassing many pathologies and these are common injuries in both elite and amateur athletes as well as in the general population.

Skeletal muscle injuries represent a great part of all traumas in sports medicine, with an incidence from 10% to 55% of all sustained injuries. The muscles and muscle groups more frequently involved are the hamstrings, rectus femoris, and the medial head of the gastrocnemius. They should be treated with the necessary precaution since a failed treatment can postpone an athlete’s return to the field for weeks or even months and increase the risk of re-injury.

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