Category: Athletic Sports Performance Massage

Fractured Patella for Runners – Hairline Fractures

Fractured Patella for Runners – Hairline Fractures

A hairline kneecap fracture is a simple crack in the bone (the patella is still in one piece). Hairline fractures are also known as stress fractures and are rare in the kneecap. They can occur in athletes, such as marathon runners, and may be due to overuse. A stress fracture of the patella may be difficult to see on an X-ray. The main symptom is a pain in the front of the knee that gets worse over time.

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Peroneal Tendonitis / Superior Peroneal Retinaculum (spr) & Cross-Fiber Friction Massage

Peroneal Tendonitis / Superior Peroneal Retinaculum (spr) & Cross-Fiber Friction Massage

I don’t like long complicated answers so here’s goes! I guess I got a little carried away! LOL

Your question is about friction massage and a tendon called the superior peroneal retinaculum (spr). I work on a lot of runners with many similar issues. You don’t say how long ago and how you injured your ankle. You also don’t mention if you have had an MD or specialist look at you and did they refer you to have x-rays or an MRI. If you have insurance the MRI would be very helpful. You also don’t mention if you have had Physical Therapy for your leg and foot. I’ve found in the past that MRI with or without a diagnosis combined with a good physical therapist and a knowledgeable sports LMT works pretty well.  Regardless, applying different friction massages in different areas of the foot and leg is what works. I’ve found that you should also work the entire foot, calf muscles, and the front of the leg at many different angles. Unfourtually, most people can’t apply the pressure needed and take the pain that is required to break up the microscopic adhesions and scar tissue to increase blood and oxygen flow in those areas that already have limited blood and oxygen flow.

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Massage for Muscle Pulls & Strains

Massage for Muscle Pulls & Strains

A muscle strain, or pulled muscle, occurs when your muscle is overstretched or torn. This usually occurs as a result of fatigue, overuse, or improper use of a muscle. Strains can happen in any muscle, but they’re most common in your lower back, neck, shoulder, and hamstring, which is the muscle behind your thigh.

These strains can cause pain and may limit movement within the affected muscle group. Mild to moderate strains can be successfully treated at home with ice, heat, and anti-inflammatory medications. Severe strains or tears may require medical treatment.

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Facts and Massage for Knee Injuries

Facts and Massage for Knee Injuries

The knee is a complicated joint. It moves like a door hinge, allowing a person to bend and straighten their legs so they can sit, squat, jump, and run.

Knee pain is a common complaint that affects people of all ages. Knee pain may be the result of an injury, such as a ruptured ligament or torn cartilage. Medical conditions — including arthritis, gout, and infections — also can cause knee pain.

Many types of minor knee pain respond well to self-care measures. Physical therapy and knee braces also can help relieve knee pain. In some cases, however, your knee may require surgical repair.

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Iliopsoas Pain

Iliopsoas Pain

Iliopsoas tendonitis is characterized by pain and clicking or snapping in the groin or front of the hip. Because the iliopsoas muscle acts as a hip flexor, symptoms are often worse when bending the hip, especially against resistance. The iliopsoas tendon is fairly close to the skin.

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Facts for Athletes on Sports Injury Icing

Facts for Athletes on Sports Injury Icing

Many are familiar with Dr. Gabe Mirkin’s simple advice for treating acute sports injuries, RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation). In fact, most individuals have been told to “put ice on it” in some capacity or another for as long as they can remember. Now, almost forty years after its original publication, Dr. Mirkin has caught the sports medicine world by storm with his 2014 retraction. “Almost forty years ago, I coined the term RICE as the treatment for acute sports injuries. Subsequent research shows that rest and ice can actually delay recovery. Mild movements help tissue to heal and the application of cold suppresses the immune responses that start and hasten recovery.”1

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