Category: athletic injuries

Fractured Patella for Runners – Hairline Fractures

Fractured Patella for Runners – Hairline Fractures

A hairline kneecap fracture is a simple crack in the bone (the patella is still in one piece). Hairline fractures are also known as stress fractures and are rare in the kneecap. They can occur in athletes, such as marathon runners, and may be due to overuse. A stress fracture of the patella may be difficult to see on an X-ray. The main symptom is a pain in the front of the knee that gets worse over time.

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Insertional Achilles Tendinitis

Insertional Achilles Tendinitis

Insertional Achilles tendinitis involves the lower portion of the heel, where the tendon attaches (inserts) to the heel bone. In both non insertional and insertional Achilles tendinitis, damaged tendon fibers may also calcify (harden). Bone spurs (extra bone growth) often form with insertional Achilles tendinitis. Insertional Achilles Tendinitis is pain and inflammation at the insertion of the Achilles Tendon on the heel bone. It is often associated with swelling, redness, and calcium buildup (small bump) located at the back of the heel (see picture). Pressure at the back of the heel tends to be sensitive and painful. In the clinic, some of my clients often report that certain tight shoes might cause more pain in this area from the pressure and have to sometimes resort to open back shoes.  

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Peroneal Tendonitis / Superior Peroneal Retinaculum (spr) & Cross-Fiber Friction Massage

Peroneal Tendonitis / Superior Peroneal Retinaculum (spr) & Cross-Fiber Friction Massage

I don’t like long complicated answers so here’s goes! I guess I got a little carried away! LOL

Your question is about friction massage and a tendon called the superior peroneal retinaculum (spr). I work on a lot of runners with many similar issues. You don’t say how long ago and how you injured your ankle. You also don’t mention if you have had an MD or specialist look at you and did they refer you to have x-rays or an MRI. If you have insurance the MRI would be very helpful. You also don’t mention if you have had Physical Therapy for your leg and foot. I’ve found in the past that MRI with or without a diagnosis combined with a good physical therapist and a knowledgeable sports LMT works pretty well.  Regardless, applying different friction massages in different areas of the foot and leg is what works. I’ve found that you should also work the entire foot, calf muscles, and the front of the leg at many different angles. Unfourtually, most people can’t apply the pressure needed and take the pain that is required to break up the microscopic adhesions and scar tissue to increase blood and oxygen flow in those areas that already have limited blood and oxygen flow.

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Massage for Subluxation

Massage for Subluxation

What does subluxation mean in medical terms?

incomplete dislocation

A subluxation is usually defined as a partial or incomplete dislocation.

Define-

a partial dislocation.
“a subluxation associated with a fracture”
a slight misalignment of the vertebrae, regarded in chiropractic theory as the cause of many health problems.
“Subluxation” is a term used by some chiropractors to describe a spinal vertebra that is out of position in comparison to the other vertebrae, possibly resulting in functional loss and determining where the chiropractor should manipulate the spine.

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