Hunter’s Canal 

The Hunter’s canal (subsartorial, adductor canal) is an aponeurotic tunnel in the middle third of the thigh, extending from the apex of the femoral triangle to the opening in the adductor magnus, the adductor hiatus.[1] It is 15cm long and is a passageway for structures moving between the anterior thigh and posterior leg.[2]

What is the significance of the adductor canal?
 
 
The adductor canal serves as a passageway for structures moving between the anterior thigh and posterior leg. It transmits the femoral artery, femoral vein (posterior to the artery), nerve to the vastus medialis and the saphenous nerve – the largest cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve.

 

Structure

 
Boundaries of the adductor canal.

The Hunter’s canal is bordered by muscular structures:

The apex of the adductor canal is marked by the adductor hiatus – a gap between the adductor and hamstring attachments of the adductor magnus.[2] It is covered by a strong aponeurosis, the anteromedial intermuscular septum (subsartorial fascia) which extends from the vastus medialis, across the femoral vessels to the Adductor Longus and adductor magnus. Lying on the aponeurosis is the sartorius (tailor’s) muscle.[1]

 

The canal contains the following:

 
Adductor Canal represented in green region.

It consists of three foramina: superior, anterior, and inferior. The femoral artery with its vein and the saphenous nerve enters this canal through the superior foramen. Then, the saphenous nerve and artery and vein of genus descendens exit through the anterior foramen, piercing the vastoadductor intermuscular septum. Finally, the femoral artery and vein exit via the inferior foramen (usually called the hiatus) through the inferior space between the oblique and medial heads of the adductor magnus.[1]

Clinical Relevance

Adductor Canal Block

In the adductor canal block, local anesthetic is administered in the adductor canal to block the saphenous nerve in isolation, or together with the nerve to the vastus medialis. The block can be used to provide sensory anesthesia for procedures involving the distal thigh and femurknee, and lower leg on the medial side. The sartorius and femoral artery are used as anatomical landmarks to locate the saphenous nerve.[2]

Adductor Canal Compression Syndrome

Adductor canal compression syndrome describes the entrapment of the neurovascular bundle within the adductor canal. A rare condition, it is usually caused by hypertrophy of adjacent muscles such as vastus medialis. It is most common in young males, who may present with claudication symptoms due to femoral artery occlusion (more common) or neurological symptoms due to entrapment of the saphenous nerve.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Adductor canal
The femoral artery. (Canal not labeled, but region visible at center right.)
Cross-section through the middle of the thigh (the right thigh if seen from below)
Details
Identifiers
Latin Canalis adductorius
TA98 A04.7.03.006
TA2 2611
FMA 58781
Anatomical terminology

The adductor canal (also known as the subsartorial canal, or Hunter’s canal) is an aponeurotic tunnel in the middle third of the thigh giving passage to parts of the femoral arteryvein, and nerve. It extends from the apex of the femoral triangle to the adductor hiatus.

Structure

The adductor canal extends from the apex of the femoral triangle to the adductor hiatus. It is an intermuscular cleft situated on the medial aspect of the middle third of the anterior compartment of the thigh, and has the following boundaries:

It is covered by a strong aponeurosis which extends from the vastus medialis, across the femoral vessels to the adductor longus and Magnus.

  • Lying on the aponeurosis is the sartorius (tailor’s) muscle.

Contents

The canal contains the subsartorial artery (distal segment of the femoral artery), subsartorial vein (distal segment of the femoral vein), and branches of the femoral nerve (specifically, the saphenous nerve, and the nerve to the vastus medialis).[1][2][3] The femoral artery with its vein and the saphenous nerve enters this canal through the superior foramen. Then, the saphenous nerve and artery and vein of genus descendens exit through the anterior foramen, piercing the vastoadductor intermuscular septum. Finally, the femoral artery and vein exit via the inferior foramen (usually called the hiatus) through the inferior space between the oblique and medial heads of the adductor magnus

 

 


 

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